Solar Cells made out of Quantum dots Lead to an Increase in Energy Efficiency

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Ashley Marshall, Erin Sanehira and Joey Luther with solutions of all-inorganic perovskite quantum dots, showing intense photoluminescence when illuminated with UV light.

A way has been found to make perovskite solar cells out of quantum dots. The material is then used to convert sunlight to electricity, providing 10.77 percent efficiency it is claimed.

A method was also discovered to stabilize a crystal structure in an all-inorganic perovskite material at room temperature rather than at the high temperatures used previously. The Energy Department at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), which undertook the research, explained that the crystal phase of the inorganic material is more stable in quantum dots.

Whereas photovoltaics work on perovskites has tended towards a hybrid organic-inorganic structure, this organic component has not been considered durable enough for long term use.

As a consequence NREL switched attention to quantum dots, which are essentially nanocrystals-of cesium lead iodide (CsPbI3) removing the unstable organic element and resulting in high-efficiency quantum dot optoelectronics commonly used in LED lights and photovoltaics.

The SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national effort that aggressively drives innovation to make solar energy fully cost-competitive with traditional energy sources before the end of the decade.

The research was part of the SunShot national Initiative, a collaborative effort to drive innovation in an effort to make solar energy fully cost-competitive with traditional energy sources before the end of the decade.

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